Our Fair Lady of Hanging~

1920’s/Prohibition AU info dump

I decided it would be best to organize all the info that Tako and I made up for this au in one post~. So it’ll be long and go into a readmore, as well, it should be noted the au is still a wip so some characters aren’t included~.

Read More

zekkyoupanda:

drawing body structures like

image

(Source: grethscollection)

someoneinjersey:

qualiachameleon:

rocketumbl:

Theo Jansen  Strandbeest

Side note: These don’t have motors. They’re completely momentum/wind-powered and literally just wander around beaches unsupervised like giant abstract monsters.

NOPE NOPE NOPE NOPE NOPE

jibblyuniverse:

derpfire:

jibblyuniverse:

frenums:

things that will always sound sarcastic

  • good for you
  • thanks a lot
  • yeah right
  • nice to know
  • wow
  • way to go
  • totally
  • ok buddy

Not if you say ‘man’ at the end

ok buddy man

I might not have thought that last one through

tragedyseries:

It was nice to meet some of you at SDCC. This craft-project would have bee useful at times during that humid span of days. I recommend printing out on sturdy stock!

tragedyseries:

It was nice to meet some of you at SDCC. This craft-project would have bee useful at times during that humid span of days. I recommend printing out on sturdy stock!

unexplained-events:

Ed and Lorraine Warrens Occult Museum

Houses over 50 years of haunted objects. The most famous of which is, Annabelle the Raggedy Ann Doll.

ultrafacts:

Source For more facts, Follow Ultrafacts

ultrafacts:

Source For more facts, Follow Ultrafacts

art-of-swords:

Great Britain’s Sword of State

  • Maker: George Bowers, goldsmith, active 1660
  • Dated: 1678 - 1698
  • Medium: steel, silver gilt, the scabbard of wood, velvet, silver gilt.
  • Measurements: 121.3 x 32.1 cm
  • Acquirer: Charles II, King of Great Britain (1630-85), when King of Great Britain de facto (1660-85)
  • Provenance: supplied to Charles II in 1678, the scabbard supplied to William III

The sword has a broad, straight, flat, two-edged steel blade with etched decoration, and a cruciform silver-gilt hilt, the quillons in the form of a rampant lion and unicorn, a fleur-de-lis at the front of the quillon block and a Tudor rose at the back, with a portcullis above. The wooden scabbard is covered in velvet with applied silver-gilt emblems including a rose, thistle, harp and fleur-de-lis, with a portcullis, royal lions and the coat of arms of William III.

This sword, known as the Sword of State, was traditionally used by the monarch after the coronation, in place of the Sword of Offering (which was kept with the regalia in the Abbey), for all formal occasions, when it would have been carried before the sovereign. The hilt of the sword and the decorative emblems on the scabbard show that it was intended to be carried with the point upwards.

Two swords of state were made for Charles II - the first in 1660, and this one in 1678. It is described as 'a new Sword of Estate most extraordinarily wrought Enchased and gilt'. The 1660 sword was used when Charles II attended Parliament, and this example was used at other formal occasions such as the ceremonial creation of the Knights of the Bath.

The scabbard carries the coat of arms of William III and so dates from his coronation. The 1660 sword no longer exists but this one has remained among the regalia in the Tower of London. It is still used occasionally by the Queen for events such as the investiture of the Prince of Wales in 1969 and the VE Day service in St Paul’s Cathedral in 1995.

Source: Copyright © 2014 The Royal Collection Trust/Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II

tags → #lin #magimouto 

(Source: lemurheadey)